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GIS Workshop makes front page news at The Star Press

At the conclusion of GIS Workshop (GEOG448/548), each student team presented their findings to community partners.  While all the student teams created products that will greatly assist their community partners, the animal shelter project, in particular, captured the attention of the community partners.  The Star Press, drawing on recent concerns about the operation of the animal shelter, ran a story about the mapping project.

An excerpt:

It's raining stray cats and dogs in Muncie, and there doesn't seem to be any way to stop it.

That's what mapping by Ball State University shows. It also shows the problem is worse in south Muncie, including the Industry Neighborhood.

"There's certainly a south-of-the river phenomenon," said Matt Wilson, an assistant professor of geography and emerging media expert.

But he advises against finger-pointing.

"This is a social justice issue," said Wilson, who predicts the spread of stray animals will only become magnified unless the city tackles issues like unemployment and poverty. [Click for more.]

In my interview at TSP, I discussed the importance of these kinds of collaborations, particularly in the context of the geographical imaginations of Muncie's 'south side' on the part of BSU students and faculty.

Great work, students and community partners!  I'm certainly looking forward to future collaborations in GEOG448/548.

Comments

  1. I find this offensive. It is Central and west Muncie with most of the issue for as far as I can see.

    ReplyDelete

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