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Five-minute video wrapping up the 2010 GIS Workshop

The folks over at the Center for Media Design (thanks, Ben, Tommy, and Erin!) have pieced together this snazzy YouTube video documenting the 2010 GIS Workshop.  It contains brief interviews with community partners and my own summary comments on the conclusion of the workshop.

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Gund Hall: Gropius Room
http://tinyurl.com/HarvardCart

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[ Chris Alton, Zulaikha Ayub, Alex Chen, Leif Estrada, Justin Kollar, Patrick Leonard, Martin Pavlinic, Andreas Viglakis, Matthew Wilson ]

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