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Critical GIS Faculty Position Announced

It's very interesting to see a faculty position announced so clearly in "critical GIS"! Definitely feels like a first...

Lecturer in Human or Environmental Geography (Critical GIS Specialism)
Fixed-term for 2 years

The Department of Geography, Royal Holloway, University of London invites applications for a fixed-term lectureship in Human or Environmental Geography with a specialism in Critical GIS. A research focus on the interface between geo-technologies and environmental and/or development themes is particularly desirable. Indicative areas of interest and research include Participatory GIS, location-based digital technologies and their relationships with communications technologies, and the politics and governance of spatial data and geo-technologies.

The successful applicant would join the Politics, Development and Sustainability (PDS) Research Group. This group of about 20 research-active staff and 35 PhD students works in locations across the globe with key research foci being: communications and technologies; sustainable living; geopolitics and security. There is a strong record of collaborative research with UK and international partners in the public, private and NGO sectors.

The appointee will make a strong contribution to undergraduate teaching, developing the Department's approach towards the teaching of GIS and geo-technology and the skills-sets and employability of its graduates. The appointment will also make a significant contribution to teaching at Masters level particularly the MSc in Practising Sustainable Development, including the stream in Information and Communications Technology for Development (ICT4D).

Formal details of the posts and application procedure can be found at https://rhul.engageats.co.uk

For an informal discussion about these posts please contact the Head of Department, Professor David Gilbert  (D.Gilbert@rhul.ac.uk) or the Director of the Politics, Development and Sustainability Group, Professor Katie Willis (Katie.Willis@rhul.ac.uk).

The deadline for applications is 24 June 2012.

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